Posts from the ‘hair salons’ Category

Shiva Flat Iron in the Fall 2010 Hair Cut and Style Hairstyle Showcase

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Building Your Salon/Day Spa’s Service Statement

David Allen, author of “Getting Things Done,” wrote, “If it’s only in your head your dead.” So how does that sentence apply to customer service?

Your salon/day spa may already have a mission statement and/or a vision statement. An enlightened owner/manager knows employees/associates need to see both the bigger picture and feel the salon/day spa heading in that direction.

You also know the challenge of keeping the troops focused on client service and uses various tools to do just that.

A service strategy statement that describes what you are ultimately accomplishing with and for clients helps your team members understand the true purpose of the work they do.

It’s a tool that when well done can:

  • Ensure your employees are working with the same idea of “what’s really important here.”
  • Give employees a snapshot summary of the salon/spa’s mission or vision.
  • Give customer contact/service providers a point of reference for their day-to-day decision-making.
  • Help people understand the rationale for salon/day spa policies so they have confidence in resolving one time or unusual situations.
  • Give people insight into your salon/day spa’s key indicators (the things that are measured).

Why would you want to create a service statement in the first place?

  • If you don’t have a clear definition of what good service means, then the odds of your salon/day spa achieving it are about 30%.
  • If you have a general definition, then the odds are about 50-50%.
  • If you have a specific definition, clearly defined in the context of both the client and the employee, and if it is well communicated, and tied into standards and indicators, your chances of achieving good service increase to about 90%.

What should a service statement look like?

  • Clear: It should be to the point, and understandable.
  • Actionable: It should communicate ways to satisfy, impress, and retain your clients.
  • Consistent: It should support the mission and vision.
  • Helpful: It should guide your employees, showing them what to do, how do it, and why. It should not make them roll their eyes and laugh silently to themselves.

How do you create one? First by including both your clients and employees in the process and by:

  • Identifying your target customer
  • Identifying your core contribution to that customer
  • Deciding what you want to be “famous” for

Like anything else, a service strategy is a tool that is meant to be used. If it simply sits in your toolbox, it will never achieve the purpose for which you designed it.

David Allen, author of “Getting Things Done,” wrote, “If it’s only in your head your dead.” So how does that sentence apply to customer service?

Your salon/day spa may already have a mission statement and/or a vision statement. An enlightened owner/manager knows employees/associates need to see both the bigger picture and feel the salon/day spa heading in that direction.

You also know the challenge of keeping the troops focused on client service and uses various tools to do just that.

A service strategy statement that describes what you are ultimately accomplishing with and for clients helps your team members understand the true purpose of the work they do.

It’s a tool that when well done can:

  • Ensure your employees are working with the same idea of “what’s really important here.”
  • Give employees a snapshot summary of the salon/spa’s mission or vision.
  • Give customer contact/service providers a point of reference for their day-to-day decision-making.
  • Help people understand the rationale for salon/day spa policies so they have confidence in resolving one time or unusual situations.
  • Give people insight into your salon/day spa’s key indicators (the things that are measured).

Why would you want to create a service statement in the first place?

  • If you don’t have a clear definition of what good service means, then the odds of your salon/day spa achieving it are about 30%.
  • If you have a general definition, then the odds are about 50-50%.
  • If you have a specific definition, clearly defined in the context of both the client and the employee, and if it is well communicated, and tied into standards and indicators, your chances of achieving good service increase to about 90%.

What should a service statement look like?

  • Clear: It should be to the point, and understandable.
  • Actionable: It should communicate ways to satisfy, impress, and retain your clients.
  • Consistent: It should support the mission and vision.
  • Helpful: It should guide your employees, showing them what to do, how do it, and why. It should not make them roll their eyes and laugh silently to themselves.

How do you create one? First by including both your clients and employees in the process and by:

  • Identifying your target customer
  • Identifying your core contribution to that customer
  • Deciding what you want to be “famous” for

Like anything else, a service strategy is a tool that is meant to be used. If it simply sits in your toolbox, it will never achieve the purpose for which you designed it.

Andrew Finkelstein, President of the Beauty Resource, is a successful New York City-based entrepreneur, author, speaker, and coach who helps professional beauty businesses get more clients. Andrew’s E-zine The Finkelstein Report is the beauty industry’s #1 marketing resource with free articles, marketing tools, and valuable advice for salons and day spas owners. Contact Andrew at http://www.thebeautyresource.com or 212-831-2421 x202

Popular shampoos contain toxic chemicals linked to nerve damage

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found a correlation between an ingredient found in shampoos and nervous system damage. The experiments were conducted with the brain cells of rats and they show that contact with this ingredient called methylisothiazoline, or MIT, causes neurological damage.

Which products contain this chemical compound MIT? Head and Shoulders, Suave, Clairol and Pantene Hair Conditioner all contain this ingredient. Researchers are concerned that exposure to this chemical by pregnant women could put their fetus at risk for abnormal brain development. In other people, exposure could also be a factor in the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other nervous system disorders.

The chemical causes these effects by preventing communication between neurons. Essentially, it slows the networking of neurons, and since the nervous system and brain function on a system of neural networks, the slowing of this network will suppress and impair the normal function of the brain and nervous system.

These finding were presented December 5th at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting.   Continued

Shear Genius Season 3 Preview with ScissorBoy Premiers Feb 3rd!

Shear Genius on Bravo Check it out click here

Houston, Texas Home of Shiva Laboratory


Shiva Natures Purest Ingredients
Originally formulated for clientele in the Houston area, SHIVA products contain only the finest ingredients to keep hair healthy and strong. For over 20 years, SHIVA Laboratories has been manufacturing these high quality and popular hair care products in Houston, Texas, and has seen sales grow each year. Our loyal customers continue to purchase SHIVA because our laboratory produces only professional-level products that perform well and smell great. Why is their performance so superior?
SHIVA products don’t contain the waxes or fillers commonly found in hair care products that weigh the hair down and cause irritating scalp build-up. Plus, SHIVA styling and finishing products combat frizz, which is a problem for most any client living in the Gulf Coast climate, and most products contain sunscreen to protect against the harmful effects of the sun.

As you begin your career as a stylist, product sales will become a large part of your financial success.

As you select the products that you will use and promote to your clients, here are a few tips you can use to select wisely.

Are the product ingredients organic and natural?

Are the products cruelty free? (Not tested on animals)

Does the product manufacturer offer promotional incentives?

Are the products available in Ulta, Walgreen’s, Target and Wal-Mart?

Are you required to purchase the entire product line or can you pick and choose your favorites?

Do they formulate the products with water that has a 5 step purification process?

Will the products tailor fit your clients hair care needs?

Is the product manufacturer environmentally conscience and responsible?

Do they use one-layer packaging created from recycled plastic?

Does the product contain sunscreen?

Do the products contain hair damaging preservatives?

Do the products contain waxes and fillers?

Are the products sold exclusively in salons ONLY?

All of these questions are relevant to your success. Providing the highest quality hair care products for your clients’ improves results, adds credibility and increases sales. When you choose your salons hair care line, choose products that are exclusively available at professional salons. Why educate and introduce your valuable customers to great products only to have them bypass your salon and purchase them directly from other mainstream sources like Walmart, Ulta and Target.

Utilizing salon exclusive products keeps your customers coming back to your salon, builds stronger relationships and helps reduce salon attrition.

The most successful salon professionals integrate personal styling, product education and product sales.

Frank Tavakoli Shiva 21 Century Laboratory

As you begin your career as a stylist, product sales will become a large part of your financial success.



As you select the products that you will use and promote to your clients, here are a few tips you can use to select wisely.

Are the product ingredients organic and natural?

Are the products cruelty free? (Not tested on animals)

Does the product manufacturer offer promotional incentives?

Are the products available in Ulta, Walgreen’s, Target and Wal-Mart?

Are you required to purchase the entire product line or can you pick and choose your favorites?

Do they formulate the products with water that has a 5 step purification process?

Will the products tailor fit your clients hair care needs?

Is the product manufacturer environmentally conscience and responsible?

Do they use one-layer packaging created from recycled plastic?

Does the product contain sunscreen?

Do the products contain hair damaging preservatives?

Do the products contain waxes and fillers?

Are the products sold exclusively in salons ONLY?

All of these questions are relevant to your success. Providing the highest quality hair care products for your clients’ improves results, adds credibility and increases sales. When you choose your salons hair care line, choose products that are exclusively available at professional salons. Why educate and introduce your valuable customers to great products only to have them bypass your salon and purchase them directly from other mainstream sources like Walmart, Ulta and Target.

Utilizing salon exclusive products keeps your customers coming back to your salon, builds stronger relationships and helps reduce salon attrition.

The most successful salon professionals integrate personal styling, product education and product sales.