Posts from the ‘hairdresser’ Category

Fear Factor Haircut ..This is Terrible!

Firing Right—Letting People Go with Dignity

Here’s a quick primer culled from executives and outplacement experts on how to fire people without bruising their egos.

  • Give warning. All performance-based firings should begin with a warning or probationary period. If you let employees know they’re on the edge, they just might turn things around. If they’ve put in years of service, it’s the least they deserve.
  • Document, document, document. Once you’ve told an employee she/he’s on probation, document every task and interaction. The better records you keep, the easier it will be to justify your actions should you find yourself defending them in legal proceedings.
  • Time it right. Fire early in the day and early in the week. The worse time to terminate an employee is the day before a weekend or holiday.
  • Prepare the paperwork. Don’t wait until after you fire an employee to deliver termination paperwork. Deliver pay, including any benefits and unused vacation, on the spot. This is not only good policy, frequently it’s the law.
  • Don’t go it alone. Have someone else with you in the room. It adds a sense of seriousness and finality to the termination conversation. It also provides a witness on your side should you end up in court.
  • Ensure privacy. Make it clear to the employee that only you and the other person (your witness) will take part in the termination meeting. Reassure the employee that nobody else will be in on what’s happening. Neglecting this will make her/him self-conscious.
  • Be brief. Say what you have to say, say it clearly and don’t say any more. Prolonging the meeting allows the employee to believe she/he is involved in a negotiation—there may be a way out. When she/ he realizes there isn’t, she/he will feel betrayed.
  • Watch your tone. Choose your words carefully and make sure you convey a tone of cordiality and sympathy. Be compassionate but firm, honest but guarded. Never say, “I know what you’re going through,” even if you do.
  • Seek feedback. Although it’s important to keep the meeting short, encourage the employee to voice her/his feelings after you’ve delivered the news. If she/he doesn’t answer immediately, count to 20 before moving on. The last thing you want is a reputation for being heartless. However, if recriminations result, take charge and cut her/him off; remember that you’re declaring the employee fired, not engaging in a dialogue.
  • Give a good send-off. Always offer words of encouragement and confidence in the employee’s future career. Stand and extend your hand to indicate the meeting has ended. Thank the employee for her/his service and don’t be surprised or hurt if the employee declines to thank you for firing her/him.

Andrew Finkelstein, President of the Beauty Resource, is a successful New York City-based entrepreneur, author, speaker, and coach who helps professional beauty businesses get more clients. Andrew’s E-zine The Finkelstein Report is the beauty industry’s #1 marketing resource with free articles, marketing tools, and valuable advice for salons and day spas owners. Contact Andrew at TheBeautyResource.com

Shiva Flat Iron in the Fall 2010 Hair Cut and Style Hairstyle Showcase

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Hair History ~ Hair Receivers, Secret Beauty Aids of the Past

By Mike McLeod

Although rare today, the hair receiver was a common fixture on the dressing tables of women from Victorian times to the early decades of the 20th century. Its purpose was to save hair culled from the hairbrush and comb, which were used vigorously on a daily basis. The hair could then be stuffed into pincushions or pillows. Since hair was not washed as often as it is today, oils were frequently used to add scent and shine to hair. The residual oil made the hair an ideal stuffing for pincushions because it lubricated the pins, making it easier for them to pierce material. Small pillows could be stuffed with hair, which was less prickly than pinfeathers.

But possibly most important, hair receivers made the creation of ratts possible. A ratt (sometimes spelled rat) is a small ball of hair that was inserted into a hairstyle to add volume and fullness. The ratt was made by stuffing a sheer hairnet until it was about the size of a potato and then sewing it shut.

A favored hairstyle during Victorian times parted the hair in the center and pulled it to the sides. In photos from that era, it is easy to spot the women with flat hair who were not using ratts and those with “big hair” who were. One reason for favoring this hairstyle was it revealed as much of the face as possible. In Renaissance times, a wide and high forehead was a sign of virtue. This is why paintings from that era often portray women with just a little hair showing around the face and a big, wide forehead. Since Victorian women only used a little face powder and no other make-up lest she be scandalized as a “painted lady,” much effort was invested in hairstyles and clothing to maximize beauty.

Another reason for their desire to display as much of the head as possible was that the Victorians were swept up in the new, so-called “science” of phrenology. This craze postulated that a person’s qualities and characteristics, both good and bad, could be determined by the contours of one’s head. Or as some people have called it, by “reading the bumps on your head.” This curious infatuation of the Victorians is discussed below.

The Victorians were extremely concerned with their appearances, and a woman’s hair was considered her crowning glory. In 1894, an article in The Delineator magazine stated, “The often-admired ‘crowning glory’ may be rendered almost a disfigurement if disposed unbecomingly, while a tasteful and careful dressing of the tresses, even though they are not very beautiful, will lend a decided charm to a plain face.”

Usually identified by the hole in the lid for inserting hair, hair receivers graced the dressing tables of women from Victorian times to the 1950s. (Photo courtesy of and from the personal collection of Elza Brokaw.)

The use of wigs was common at this time, for women and men (judges, magistrates, and even soldiers wore wigs into battle). However, these were usually made from someone else’s hair. A woman could use a ratt to create a beautiful hairstyle and truthfully answer that this was her own hair.

The widespread use of “extra hair” is evidenced by this instruction from Godey’s Lady’s Book: “When a lady is in danger of drowning, raise her by the dress and not by the hair, which oftentimes remains in the grasp.”

A hair receiver can be identified by a finger-wide hole in the lid, through which hair is poked. They can be round or square in shape, and some are footed. Made of a variety of materials, including glass and in later times celluloid, some of the prettiest examples are of porcelain. RS Prussia manufactured beautiful hair receivers, and one with delicate floral prints sold recently on eBay for $152. However, you will usually see the finer antique hair receivers hovering in the $100 range, while most are well below that amount.

It is uncertain if Japanese women also collected their spare hair for adornment, but Japanese potters certainly created hair receivers. You can find Nippon, Kutani and Sumida hair receivers.

While some say that hair saved in receivers was also used for hair jewelry, love tokens, and mourning mementos, Lori Verge, curator of the Surratt House Museum in Clinton, Maryland, states those items required straight, not tangled hair. She believes that women used cut hair (rather than combed out hair) for those purposes. Ms. Verge also reports that her grandmother used a hair receiver as late as the 1950s.

Check other great antiques. at Southeastern Antiquing and Collecting Magazine

Shear Genius Season 3 Preview with ScissorBoy Premiers Feb 3rd!

Shear Genius on Bravo Check it out click here

As you begin your career as a stylist, product sales will become a large part of your financial success.



As you select the products that you will use and promote to your clients, here are a few tips you can use to select wisely.

Are the product ingredients organic and natural?

Are the products cruelty free? (Not tested on animals)

Does the product manufacturer offer promotional incentives?

Are the products available in Ulta, Walgreen’s, Target and Wal-Mart?

Are you required to purchase the entire product line or can you pick and choose your favorites?

Do they formulate the products with water that has a 5 step purification process?

Will the products tailor fit your clients hair care needs?

Is the product manufacturer environmentally conscience and responsible?

Do they use one-layer packaging created from recycled plastic?

Does the product contain sunscreen?

Do the products contain hair damaging preservatives?

Do the products contain waxes and fillers?

Are the products sold exclusively in salons ONLY?

All of these questions are relevant to your success. Providing the highest quality hair care products for your clients’ improves results, adds credibility and increases sales. When you choose your salons hair care line, choose products that are exclusively available at professional salons. Why educate and introduce your valuable customers to great products only to have them bypass your salon and purchase them directly from other mainstream sources like Walmart, Ulta and Target.

Utilizing salon exclusive products keeps your customers coming back to your salon, builds stronger relationships and helps reduce salon attrition.

The most successful salon professionals integrate personal styling, product education and product sales.