Posts from the ‘Silkology Hair Care’ Category

Four Big Time Pricing Myths

Pricing your services and/or products is an integral part of your salon/day spa generating the sales and profits you are looking for.

The question you want to ask yourself is what prices should we be charging? When you think about the answer, please keep your objective clearly in the forefront.

For sure your ultimate objective is to maximize the amount of money your business makes. It’s just that on the road to doing that you can use pricing as a strategy (there’ll be more on pricing as a strategy in a future Finkelstein Report).

However before we can even make pricing decisions it’s important to wipe your mind clean from four big pricing myths. If you hang onto these myths, you’ll be sure to dilute any advantage that a pricing strategy will bring to your salon/day spa.

Myth #1 Price is the client’s most important buying criteria. Sure price is important; however, it usually comes up around #4 in consumer shopping surveys about what’s important to them. Yes, there are people who buy based strictly on price. The question you must answer is do you want to do business with these folks?

Myth #2 You have to match or even slightly under-price your services or product in a competitive or commodity driven market. With so many different ways to differentiate your salon/day spa, I’m astounded people even think this way.

For instance, you could try:

  • Specializing in a particular niche within the beauty niche (example: hair color or laser treatments)
  • Touting your experience or credentials
  • Partnering with top of the line manufacturers
  • Limiting accessibility

Myth #3 Pricing only involves taking the cost of your service or product and marking it up by your desired profit margin. Unfortunately, too many salons/day spas don’t have a handle on their true costs so even if they wanted to do cost-plus pricing they couldn’t. For that matter, cost-plus pricing may have nothing to do with the value of your services or with the market price.

However, if you don’t know already, please find out the cost of delivering the service and figure out what gross margin you need to cover all your fixed expenses.

Myth #4 If your sales are stagnant or falling behind, just drop your price and they will increase. Remember that although people put a high value on price, they also put a high value on quality. In the service business, perception is reality, so when you lower the price you chip away at the perception of your quality.

There are ways to justify lowering prices, if you believe you can retain the clients once you have them in the door and up-sell and cross-sell them with other services. However, if you lower your prices to increase sales you could very well be accelerating your losses.

Andrew Finkelstein, President of the Beauty Resource, is a successful New York City-based entrepreneur, author, speaker, and coach who helps professional beauty businesses get more clients. Andrew’s E-zine The Finkelstein Report is the beauty industry’s #1 marketing resource with free articles, marketing tools, and valuable advice for salons and day spas owners. Contact Andrew at http://www.thebeautyresource.com or 212-831-2421 x202

Human Hair Used to Measure Humidity in the Air

Does your hair go crazy when the weather turns damp? Did you know that strands of hair can relax and lengthen when the humidity increases and then contract again when the humidity decreases? In fact, hair strands can be used as the basis for a hygrometer, a device which measures the humidity level in the air.

Humidity is one of the important measurements that weather observers make because the amount of water vapor in the air determines whether clouds or fog are likely and whether it’s going to rain or snow.

Human (or animal) hair turns out to be a pretty good way to measure the humidity, as anyone who’s ever complained about a “bad hair day,” can tell you.
The length of a strand of human hair changes with different relative humidities.
As the relative humidity increases, hair becomes longer, and as the humidity drops it becomes shorter. On very humid days, your hair actually becomes longer and this extra length causes the frizziness that gives us bad hair days.
An instrument that uses hair to measure humidity is known as a hair hygrometer. This instrument uses strands of human or horse hair with the oils removed attached to levers that magnify a small change in hair length.
An ink pen and rotating cylinder, known as a hygrograph, can provide a record of how relative humidity varies throughout the day.
The disadvantages of the hair hygrometer and hygrograph are that they are not as accurate as other kinds of hygrometers such as the sling psychrometer. Also, a hair hygrometer needs frequent adjustment and calibration.

A hair hygrometer also tends to have large errors at very high and very low relative humidities.

How to Add Special Touches to Updos

by: Jenny Andrews

If you want to create a special and dramatic look for that special occasion, the last thing you want to do is look like a cookie-cutter Barbie doll when it comes to your hairstyle. And the truth is that many of your formal hairstyles were probably just that, exact replicas of styles that were worn on every special occasion for years stretching back into time. But it doesn’t have to be that way. You can create a different and exciting new updo for each and every formal occasion even if you only know how to do one type of formal hairstyle.

You see, the key to creating a different look lies in the details. You could actually style your hair in a French twist without having the same look twice if you added special touches and elements to your style. Here’s how:

· Straighten instead of curl – In many updos, the free pieces are curled with a curling iron. You can change your look simply by using a flat iron to sleek down these pieces instead of curling them up. You can even alternate using a crimping iron and flat iron to create a dramatic effect.

· Leave pieces free for effect – You can also experiment by leaving different pieces of your updo free. For example: try leaving a ½” section of hair around your complete hairline free from the updo. Pull your hair up into a simple pony tail. Then, take ½” sections of the free hair and crisscross it in a basket-weave style on top of your updo. Pin into place, and you’ve created a unique look with little effort.

· Use accessories – By using simple accessories such as hair extensions of a different color than your hair and ribbons, you can add a lot of interest to your updo. Simply insert small strands of hair or ribbon into your style to create splash of color and drama. You can color coordinate these with your dress or use natural colors that will compliment your hair color.

· Flowers – Inserting a small floral accessory into your updo is also a good idea as long as you don’t take it overboard. Choose very small flowers and use them sparingly. Using too many will make you look like a flower arrangement. Remember, accessories are used to compliment your style, not overpower it.

In addition to these ideas, there are many more that you can experiment with. Just remember that small changes make a big difference when it comes to adding that special touch to your updo. So, even if you don’t have a lot of creativity and talent, you can still create breathtaking updos that will be envied by all who see them.

About The Author

Jenny Andrews is a hair expert, and the author of an incredible free minicourse, that explains how to find your unique style, how long or short you should have your hair, how to find the right hair color for you, how to find the right salon, and a lot more.

Go to http://www.hairstylevillage.com/ now and get this amazing hair minicourse – absolutely free.

A Short Menu of Profitable Direct Mail Formats

A Short Menu of Profitable Direct Mail Formats 

by Dean Rieck

One of the beauties of direct mail is that it allows you to send people just about anything you can print. Your creative options are virtually endless. And while the standard envelope package is usually considered the most effective, there are plenty of other formats you can test.

Often an alternate format will increase response. But even if your response ends up being lower, many formats let you deliver your message at a reduced cost while maintaining enough response to offset the difference and give you more net profit. Here are a few format ideas:

  • Reduce costs with a self-mailer. It offers low cost and a quick read, good for quickly recognized content. It also helps speed response because it’s not as in-depth as a full package and looks more urgent and newsy. To make a self-mailer work at peak efficiency, combine elements of a standard direct mail package and a print ad. Include a strong headline in bold type, copy in easy-to-read sections, strong visuals, clear offer, reply card, toll-free number, message or mini-letter printed near the recipient’s address, feature list, testimonials, guarantee, and other elements as needed.
  • Signal exclusivity with an invitation. To make an offer special, you can issue an invitation in the appropriate format, usually a smaller envelope and letter on high-quality paper. This works best for offers targeted to high-income prospects, professionals, and executive level positions; for events such as conferences, meetings, and presentations; or for offers that need a quality feel.
  • Add urgency with a telegram. This is a good idea that is, unfortunately, wildly overused. It can be little more than an envelope design, such as “Urgent Gram,” “Speed Gram,” or some variation. Or it might be an envelope and letter combo resembling an actual telegram printed on yellow paper with tractor-feed holes down the sides of the letter. One way to make this format work is to create your own urgent-looking envelope for fulfillment materials. This allows the envelope to get noticed and assures that the contents will be relevant and interesting instead of boilerplate.
  • Create an official look with a snap-pack. This format is often used for official notices or statements, so it gives your ad message the same feel. And because the recipient has to rip open the edge of the envelope and pull out the contents, it creates involvement. It’s good for generating inquiries or for organizations with recognizable and trusted names. It has been used with particular success in the nonprofit sector to deliver what appears to be an urgent, cheap appeal for funds.
  • Generate quick leads with a postcard. Direct sales are possible with postcards but only for simple offers, such as magazine subscriptions. They are much better for building traffic for local retail or for generating inquiries for familiar services, such as real estate or carpet cleaning. However, because response is so easy, lead quality is often low. But it’s worth testing. Just remember to telegraph your message with a clear benefit headline, strong and tangible offer, a picture of what you’re offering, lean copy, and a bold call to action.
  • Use dimensional mailings cautiously. Boxes, bags, tubes, folders, and other unusual formats are great for getting attention. But while there are plenty of examples of successful campaigns, these formats are usually misused, wasting money on a novel format when a standard format could deliver a more powerful message and net a greater response or profit. Most of the dimensional mailings I have seen are simply a way for ad agencies to jack up their fee and cover up the fact that they don’t have anything to say about a product or service.
  • When in doubt, use an envelope package. The classic direct mail package consists of an outer envelope (usually #10, 6”x9”, or 9”x12”), a letter, brochure, reply card or order form, maybe one or more inserts, and a reply envelope. The reason this format is a standard is that it has been developed, tested, and perfected over many years. And it works. Test other formats but don’t be different just to be different.
  • Test formats head-to-head. The important point in format testing is to keep the offer, copy, graphics, and all creative elements as similar as possible so that you are testing the format itself and not a new creative treatment. And always test a new format in a head-to-head mailing with the old format. Never make a change until you have proven results.

Copyright © 2003 Dean Rieck. All Rights Reserved.

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Dean Rieck is a top-ranked freelance direct mail and direct marketing copywriter. He has been called “the best direct response strategist and copywriter” in America. Dean offers complete copywriting and design services for direct mail, B2B, print, sales lead generation, sales letters, e-mail and online marketing, and radio advertising. For more tips on improving your direct response advertising results, subscribe to Dean’s free direct marketing newsletter at http://www.DirectCreative.com.

If you are considering postcards, please visit  Salon Pro Marketing

GULF COAST OIL SPILL – HOW SALONS CAN HELP

Anyone and Everyone: salons, groomers, individuals can sign up to donate hair and fur clippins and nylons for our Oil Spill Booms. Our Excess Access program sign up is free, fast and helps us to coordinate the masses of donations.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP TO DONATE HAIR / FUR / NYLONS

Thousands of pounds of hair and nylons are coming in by UPS and FED EX from every State in the US and from Canada, Brazil, France, UK… Booms are being made all along the Gulf Coast near beaches and marshes. What a community feeling! We all get it. We shampoo because hair collects oil! More Info

OIL SPILL HAIRBOOMS AND HAIRMATS
Here we look at fibers (hair, wool, fur, feathers…). Thousands of salons mail us hair clippings, swept up off their floors, and the fibers are stuffed into booms or woven into hair mats. We all know about shampooing our oily hair, but it took Phill McCrory, a stylist from Alabama, to realize that hair was also an efficient and abundant material for collecting and containing petroleum spills.

For how you can get involved please visit Matter of Trust

Check out this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tg9vdnOuEhk

Hair Loss after Face Lifts and other Cosmetic Surgeries

Hair loss is a common complication of face and brow lifts, but this is rarely explained to the patients considering these procedures. Alopecia from face and brow lifts can be due to a number of factors:

* Destruction of hair from incisions not parallel to the follicles
* Destruction of hair from suturing
* Destruction of follicles from undermining
* Excessive skin tension
* Disruption of the vascular network in the skin
* Stretched scars devoid of hair
* Distortion of the normal hairline
* Decreased density from stretching the scalp
* Telogen effluvium from the trauma of the surgery
* Telogen effluvium from the anesthesia
* Acceleration of androgenetic alopecia

It is tempting to perform the hair restoration procedure soon after the face-lift. However, it is preferable to wait at least one year so that the surgical scars can mature, scalp laxity can return to normal and, most important, so any hair loss from post-surgical effluvium has had time to regrow.

A problem intrinsic to treating alopecia from face-lift procedures is that the hair may be transplanted into the same spot where future face-lift incisions will be placed. If the hair loss from the face-lift is not excessive and/or there is a question about long-term donor supply, it may be preferable to postpone the repair until after the second face-lift. This is especially important in younger patients where multiple face-lifts are anticipated. If such surgeries are anticipated, and if hair loss in the area surrounding the surgical incisions is the primary problem (rather than the scars themselves), one may place hair only in the surrounding areas of thinning and not in the actual scar. Another way to circumvent this problem is to avoid “aggressive” lifts or postpone aspects of the face-lift procedure that are more likely to result in hair loss, such as a brow lift.

A second problem arises when the signs of androgenic alopecia are not present (or if present, not taken into account) when the decision to perform a face-lift is made. In a patient with no apparent hair loss, potential androgenic alopecia may be suspected from a positive family history or the presence of miniaturization greater than 20% in the front or top of the scalp. This can be assessed using a hand-held Densitometer (see the section Low Donor Density). Miniaturization greater than 20% in the back or sides of the scalp (“the permanent zone”) suggests that the patient will likely develop diffuse hair loss and, therefore, is not a good candidate for hair transplantation.

Once it has been established that a face-lift patient has little risk of significant androgenetic alopecia and the decision to perform a transplant has been made, the patient should be advised that it would take a minimum of two procedures to accomplish the restoration. The goal of the first procedure is to restore the shape of the original hairline and to add as much density as possible. Subsequent sessions should be used to add further density and, when necessary, to soften the hairline’s frontal edge.

When hair loss follows a face-lift procedure, the entire frontal hairline extending down to the sideburn area often needs to be restored. In this hair transplant procedure, it is important to maintain the rounded female hairline. The hair direction in the female frontal hairline is usually more varied than the predominately-forward direction of the frontal hairline seen in males. The female hairline is often characterized by “licks” and “peaks.” These should be restored for optimum results. Especially in the case of brow lifts, there may be broad areas of thinning both anterior and posterior to the coronal incision. These regions should be filled with follicular units as closely spaced as the physician is comfortable with, as transplanted hair, compared to the more dense hair directly behind it, will generally appear too thin. Once the first few millimeters of the hairline have been transplanted with smaller units, the largest follicular units should be used to achieve the greatest frontal density possible. In spite of this, it may still take multiple procedures to achieve satisfactory density.

In contrast to men, many women have fine, vellus hairs at their frontal hairline. Since donor hair is generally harvested from the mid-portion of the permanent zone, the diameter of this hair may be too great for the frontal hairline or temples. If the match is not right (a situation that is more often seen in women with darker, coarse hair) finer hair should be used. It is not recommended to use the fine hair located on the posterior scalp or behind the ears for this purpose. Scars placed below the occipital ridge will tend to stretch, and those behind the ear may interfere with further face-lifts. The preferred method of these authors for generating finer hair is to remove all or part of a terminal hair’s bulb prior to implantation. This can be accomplished using a # 10 scalpel blade under a stereomicroscope. The single, split-hairs should be placed at the very frontal edge of the hairline and temples at an angle so acute that it is practically flush with the skin surface.

About The Author

Dr. Bernstein is Clinical Professor of Dermatology and is recognized worldwide for pioneering Follicular Unit Hair Transplantation. Dr. Bernstein’s hair restoration center in Manhattan performs hair transplants and other hair restoration procedures. To read more publications on balding and hair loss, visit http://www.bernsteinmedical.com/.